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Unsurprisingly, given the existence of the cheaper Scirocco, Volkswagen expects no more than one in every four Golf GTIs to have three doors and the split between manual and DSG transmission to be roughly equal.

Whichever GTI you end up buying, you can be assured you will be buying a car at least as well built as any other in the class. It’s also a given that it will prove residually strong relative to its classmates when you come to sell it.

Matt Burt

Matt Burt

Executive Editor, Autocar
Given its performance, the Golf GTI is commendably frugal

This extends to the cabriolet version, but then you will have to pay out far more in the first place. It carries a £3600 premium over the hatch, meaning the best part of £30k (£29,310) is required for a GTI cabriolet.

Given its performance, the Golf GTI is a commendably frugal car. We recorded average fuel consumption of 24.7mpg throughout our test, meaning light-footed owners could expect something nearer 30mpg, and its CO2 output is commensurately respectable at 170g/km.

As ever in this class, a fuel tank designed to feed the needs of a cooking hatch is never going to take a 208bhp engine that far, even with improved economy, so expect to make regular fuel stops – as frequently as once every 300 miles.

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The frequency of these fuel stops will increase further still with the Edition 35, but the gains are only commensurate with the increase in performance. VW claims 34.9mpg and 189g/km, which are comparable with the Mk5 GTI. This extends to the cabriolet version, but then you will have to pay out far more in the first place. It carries a £3600 premium over the hatch, meaning the best part of £30k (£29,310) is required for a GTI cabriolet.

The rather puny range of the petrol GTI is one argument in favour of its 168bhp GTD sister.

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