A Lamborghini wouldn’t be a Lamborghini without a low-slung driving position, a steeply raked windscreen and acres of leather and carbonfibre inside. The Gallardo 560-4 ticks all of these boxes, and with some style, but unlike rather too many of Sant’Agata’s previous creations, these classic cues are accompanied by a genuine sense of quality, excellent ergonomic clarity and a generous level of trim and equipment.

Where the car really succeeds inside is in its ability to blend some fairly obvious Audi parts – its communications package, some of its switchgear and an excellent sat-nav system – without diluting the inherent drama that has so distinguished Lamborghini interiors for over 40 years. You also get an air-con system that actually works, a rear-view image of what’s behind the car, which automatically appears when you select reverse, and a top-quality stereo. Be in no doubt, the 560-4 feels – and indeed is – a class act inside. If ever a supercar reflected its price in the style and quality of its cabin, this is it.

Steve Sutcliffe

Editor-at-large
The nose can be raised electrically, which means you can board ferries or crest speed ramps with less fear about clouting it.

You don’t buy a supercar for practical reasons, yet of its type, the 560 isn’t too bad. The boot in the bonnet is impressively deep and can take one decent-sized squashy bag, and within the cabin there are numerous well-sized cubbies for odds and ends.

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The Superleggera model gets even more lashings of carbonfibre trim as part of an overall weight reduction of 70kg, as well as new carbonfibre front seats. The rear windscreen and rear windows are also plastic.

Of course, you can drop the roof (available in black, blue, beige or grey) of the Spyder version at the press of a button, and just over 20sec later you’ll be driving a full convertible. One neat touch is that the rear screen stays in place and acts as a wind deflector with the hood down. You can even drive with the rear screen down and the roof up for a quasi-Targa-style effect, which is a neat way of telling the world that the lump of hair on your head is, in fact, all yours…

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