By leaning so heavily towards pleasing the Chinese market, there was a risk that the Flying Spur would just feel alien to the rest of us, and not a ‘proper’ Bentley as we know it; they’ve hitherto been cars built for drivers rather than passengers. 

But the resulting saloon treads a fine path and, largely, treads it well. It’s loose enough in its body movements, one would think, to please the Chinese and Americans who will mostly put their names on the equivalent of a V5.

With Bentley’s built-in capacity for varied personalisation, no two are likely to be the same. Our advice? Go tastefully crazy.

Yet, in its firmer settings, there’s enough control there to please markets with more demanding, higher-speed driving conditions.

In doing so, the Spur’s suspension, you could argue, doesn’t have a setting that suits anybody perfectly, but it will hit the spot for most.

For us, it doesn’t quite demonstrate enough functional superiority for the price. The ride needs to be better, adaptive cruise and rear-view cameras need to be standard, and the displays could be better. Ergonomic flaws like the control stalks need to be resolved as well, for the Bentley to deliver the ultimate experience.

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Nevertheless, the Bentley Flying Spur is unlikely to disappoint anyone in the market for a sumptuous-feeling, and fast-driving, luxury saloon.

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