Company says the action, which takes effect from October, is not related to Dieselgate

Volkswagen will suspend multiple diesel engines from its line-up in Australia, starting in October, although it claims that the decision is not related to the Dieselgate emissions cheating scandal

At present, the only diesel engines the company sells in the country are the 110 TDI in the Golf and Tiguan, the 135 TDI in the Golf Alltrack and the 140 TDI in the Tiguan and Passat Alltrack. 

Motoring reports that Volkswagen Australia boss Michael Bartsch insisted the decision was nothing to do with Dieselgate, saying: “Any decision about dropping diesel here is not driven by the emissions issue; it is an issue of what we can get out of Germany.”

Bartsch instead claimed that the move was intended to simplify Volkswagen's line-up, although the introduction of WLTP has added fuel to the fire. Volkswagen, which is facing demand issues with the engines amid WLTP, could reintroduce the engines later, but hasn't speculated when this may be.

In addition to the diesel lineup tweaks, Volkswagen will no longer offer Australian buyers the 110 TSI petrol engine in the Golf and Tiguan. 

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Diesel engines were previously dropped from the Passat, while the Jetta was discontinued in right-hand drive form and the petrol-only Arteon replaced the CC, which had been offered with a diesel powertrain. 

Aside from commercial vehicles, the Tiguan Allspace and new Touareg SUVs will be the only diesel Volkswagens available in Australia.

Sales of diesel vehicles Down Under have been increasing in recent years, claims Motoring, with oil-burners accounting for 22.2% of the national parc in 2017.

Elsewhere in the world, Volkswagen continues to offer diesel models across its range. Other manufacturers have turned against diesel, including Volvo, which launched its last car to be offered with a diesel, the V60, earlier this year. The new S60, due on sale in early in 2019, will be the first car in Volvo’s post-diesel era. 

Australia's diesels take a total market share of 33%, although this includes light commercial vehicles including utes and small vans. The figure remains unchanged over 2017. 

A Volkswagen UK spokesman was unable to give further comment.

Read more: 

VW emissions scandal: one year on

Volkswagen Jetta axed from UK line-up

Volvo V60 estate priced from £31,810

Volvo S60 spearheads brand's no-diesel future

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Comments
8

7 August 2018

Maybe that's some sort of threshold?I did say a couple of years back diesel sales should be around 20% in the short term but maybe that's the point the profit margin is how do I say it, marginal.

And from VAG's point of view as alot of people choose the car first then the engine it means few lost sales, if they can't get a diesel Golf they'll get a petrol one.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

7 August 2018
xxxx wrote:

Maybe that's some sort of threshold?I did say a couple of years back diesel sales should be around 20% in the short term but maybe that's the point the profit margin is how do I say it, marginal.

And from VAG's point of view as alot of people choose the car first then the engine it means few lost sales, if they can't get a diesel Golf they'll get a petrol one.

Lol, yes you did say that and it is a stupid thing to say, youre telling people what they should want, which is not, as you say an "opinion" and is unenforceable by any regulations.

In the light of todays news about climate change getting even worse and CO2 levels increasing due to declining diesel sales, the whole anti diesel thing will be looked back on by future generations as total madness - the quickest way to reduce CO2 levels in the short term, until more electric cars become available, is to continue with diesels and any non Euro6d diesel should be retro fitted with emissions equipment to bring them up to standard, something thats relatively cheap and easy to do.

XXXX just went POP.

7 August 2018
typos1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Maybe that's some sort of threshold?I did say a couple of years back diesel sales should be around 20% in the short term but maybe that's the point the profit margin is how do I say it, marginal.

And from VAG's point of view as alot of people choose the car first then the engine it means few lost sales, if they can't get a diesel Golf they'll get a petrol one.

Lol, yes you did say that and it is a stupid thing to say, youre telling people what they should want, which is not, as you say an "opinion" and is unenforceable by any regulations.

In the light of todays news about climate change getting even worse and CO2 levels increasing due to declining diesel sales, the whole anti diesel thing will be looked back on by future generations as total madness - the quickest way to reduce CO2 levels in the short term, until more electric cars become available, is to continue with diesels and any non Euro6d diesel should be retro fitted with emissions equipment to bring them up to standard, something thats relatively cheap and easy to do.

Lol, how in the world can writing 'I think diesel sales will be 20%' a couple of years ago be stupid? And I'm not telling people what they should want either. Why quote "opinion" at me I didn't even use the word.

Glad to see you still want to fit retro emissions equipment to old Euro 5 diesel cars, good luck with that idea/opinion. Can you explain what that "relatively cheap and easy to do" task entails and who pays for it?

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

FMS

10 August 2018
xxxx wrote:

typos1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Maybe that's some sort of threshold?I did say a couple of years back diesel sales should be around 20% in the short term but maybe that's the point the profit margin is how do I say it, marginal.

And from VAG's point of view as alot of people choose the car first then the engine it means few lost sales, if they can't get a diesel Golf they'll get a petrol one.

Lol, yes you did say that and it is a stupid thing to say, youre telling people what they should want, which is not, as you say an "opinion" and is unenforceable by any regulations.

In the light of todays news about climate change getting even worse and CO2 levels increasing due to declining diesel sales, the whole anti diesel thing will be looked back on by future generations as total madness - the quickest way to reduce CO2 levels in the short term, until more electric cars become available, is to continue with diesels and any non Euro6d diesel should be retro fitted with emissions equipment to bring them up to standard, something thats relatively cheap and easy to do.

Lol, how in the world can writing 'I think diesel sales will be 20%' a couple of years ago be stupid? And I'm not telling people what they should want either. Why quote "opinion" at me I didn't even use the word.

Glad to see you still want to fit retro emissions equipment to old Euro 5 diesel cars, good luck with that idea/opinion. Can you explain what that "relatively cheap and easy to do" task entails and who pays for it?

 

"If they cant get a diesel Golf they'll get a petrol one"...usual poor punctuation...what nonsense. If a buyer/leasee wants/needs a diesel fuelled car that is approx Golf size and it is unavailable, they will NOT simply buy the petrol fuelled Golf. They will buy a diesel fuelled car from the same class, ie small family hatch. Going diesel strongly suggests a particular reason to do so, eg high annual mileage, which diesel, is and will continue to serve the purpose of most ably.

Typos1 is spot on, you did say a stupid thing...among many stupid things you have said...keep going and continue to amuse us, we do enjoy rebuking you. TWIT

7 August 2018

 If we go Electric eventually, won’t there need to be more ways of generating the power required to pick up the gradual increase on the Grid of whatever Country you live in?, so, will Global warming still increase...?

Peter Cavellini.

7 August 2018

Bit of a misleading title there lads. VW here in Australia killed the Golf 110TDI (that’s the 150bhp 2.0TDI), Golf Alltrack 135TDI (180bhp 2.0TDI) and the Tiguan with the 110TDI and 140TDI (190bhp 2.0TDI) engines due to low demand and long waits out of the factory - but diesel-powered models remain and will do for some time. The Touareg is diesel-only, same with Amarok and Crafter and the Tiguan Allspace gets the 110TDI and 140TDI engines. As for Golf 110TSI - that’s the only engine in the non-sports Golf range now, so it’s not been dropped just yet. 

7 August 2018

a more accurate title for this item would be "VW Australia drops some diesels and some petrols from their line-up". Hardly ground-breaking when put like that though, is it?

7 August 2018
At the risk of sounding like a broken record, where are the hybrids and electric cars that can end this argument once for All?

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