British firm plans to ramp up its electrified offerings, but it turns out the Viva is not forever
James Attwood, digital editor
9 October 2018

Vauxhall will axe its Adam and Viva city cars at the end of next year, as part of a range revamp that will involve launching an electrified variant of every model in its line-up by 2024.

The Adam has been on sale since 2013, with the similarly sized Viva (known on the continent as the Opel Karl) launched the following year. Vauxhall says that the decision not to replace either model is motivated by two reasons: first, to help its fleet CO2 compliance target; second, as part of a refined focus on high-volume segments.

Vauxhall had already culled the SUV-inspired Adam Rocks variant earlier this year, along with the Zafira Tourer and Astra GTC.

As part of those plans, Vauxhall will launch eight new or refreshed models by 2020, starting next year with the new Corsa and the successor to the Vivaro van, which will be sold in both commercial and passenger car guises. A successor to the Mokka X SUV will be launched in 2020.

An electric version of the new Corsa will also go on sale next year, ahead of likely deliveries in 2020, alongside a plug-in hybrid version of the Grandland X SUV. The latter vehicle will use the shared PSA Group PHEV powertrain that has recently been revealed.

Vauxhall says that it will have four electrified vehicles on offer by the end of 2020 as it works towards its 2024 goal.

Read more

2020 Vauxhall Grandland X PHEV to lead fast-paced electric growth plans

Vauxhall Corsa gets radical overhaul for 2019

Vauxhall eCorsa: full details of new 2020 EV hatchback

Our Verdict

Vauxhall Grandland X

The Vauxhall Grandland X is a re-skinned Peugeot 3008 that's too bland and offers too little to stand out in an increasingly competitive market

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Join the debate

Comments
20

9 October 2018

VW Up family and Kia / Hyundai / Suzuki city cars are way better than these dire offerings....

Steam cars are due a revival.

9 October 2018
Thekrankis wrote:

VW Up family and Kia / Hyundai / Suzuki city cars are way better than these dire offerings....

Actually we found the viva was a superior offering, it bettered the up and clones to drive and be in and had better safety spec, why did we buy a mii? Because like my local kia/hyundai dealer it turns out the local vauxhall dealer was a waste of space and couldnt be arsed to reply to my finance enquiries or any other, almost like they didnt want to sell a car. But the car was very good, even autocar rated its handling etc. As others have said, its psa platform sharing, getting rid of the gm stuff.

FMS

9 October 2018
Thekrankis wrote:

VW Up family and Kia / Hyundai / Suzuki city cars are way better than these dire offerings....

 

Is your assertion borne out in the sales figures?.

9 October 2018

What a load of old tosh - dropping 3 very small cars wont help the Fleet CO2 Compliance status one bit, it will have the opposite effect. Its obvious that these 3 cars will be replaced by Vauxhall/Opel badged versions of the Aygo/108/C1, if not the current version then the next one. The relatively low cost of adding different bumpers, badges and steering wheels for Vauxhall/Opel versions will be massively offset by the increased production numbers for that platform.

XXXX just went POP.

9 October 2018

"Vauxhall says that the decision not to replace either model is motivated by two reasons: first, to help its fleet CO2 compliance target; second, as part of a refined focus on high-volume segments."

Let's face it, there are three reasons and you don't need to be a rocket scientist to work out what the 3rd was. Neither car will be missed.

9 October 2018

Yes, this is all about integrating/badge engineering small Vauxhalls into PSA's line-up. The Astra and Insignia should last a little bit longer as they are newer models...

10 October 2018
Jeremy wrote:

Yes, this is all about integrating/badge engineering small Vauxhalls into PSA's line-up. The Astra and Insignia should last a little bit longer as they are newer models...

Even at that they're itching to replace the Insignia, the Buick and Holden sales aren't holding up as well (the US are crossover crazy and in Australia a lot of fleets are dumping Holden for the Kia Stinger). It could well be that the GM supply agreement is renegotiated such that the production line is shifted to the US...

 

The new 508 would make a fine Insignia base. Or do like the Citroen C5 and run out the model in favour of SUV-land.

9 October 2018

Why don't they just say that they're moving away from GM platforms and badged engineering to PSA platforms and badge engineering and breaking unnecessary contractual ties with Renault? Hardly a big surprise. Makes sense.

9 October 2018

Agreed, the CO2 reasoning is not the real reason and in the short term it seems daft to discontinue these models until their natural life cycle has run  I can only assume that GM is charging so much money for these cars, licensing rights etc, that they are no longer profitable. But would the additional sales volume justify yet another C1 / 108 / Aygo clone? 

9 October 2018
Utterly dull cars, but photo made me look at the article, I doubt many Viva's ever experienced lift off oversteer!

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week