New petrol-electric plug-in hybrid saloon produces 320bhp and will cost from £47,450 in the UK
4 December 2018

The new E300e follows the diesel-fuelled E300de to complete the line-up of Mercedes-Benz E-Class plug-in hybrids, and it will cost from £47,450 when it goes on sale early next year.

Available only in saloon form, the E300e is powered by a 211bhp 2.0-litre petrol engine and a 122bhp electric motor, giving combined peaks of 320bhp and 516lb ft. This makes it capable of 0-62mph in 5.7sec.  

It achieves 134.5mpg on the WLTP combined cycle, with an electric-only driving range of 31 miles from a 13.5kWh battery. 

In entry-level SE trim, the E300e comes equipped with blindspot monitoring, illuminated door sills, parking assistance, 18in alloy wheels and heated front seats as standard. 

The higher-spec AMG Line trim, which costs £49,945, adds exterior styling elements taken from AMG’s range of performance cars, an AMG steering wheel, tinted windows and twin-spoke alloy wheels. An extra £2395 buys the Premium Package with Mercedes’ Comand Online communication system, wireless phone charging and a 360deg camera. 

Our Verdict

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

The Mercedes-Benz E-Class comes with fine engines and a typically laid-back dynamic character. Not one for the interested driver, but a good advert for being disinterested.

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The £4395 Premium Plus Package features keyless entry and start, a powered bootlid and a panoramic sunroof. 

Optional extras for all trim levels include lane departure warning for £595 and a comprehensive driver assistance program for £1695.

Order books for the E300e are open now, and deliveries will commence in Spring 2019. 

Read more

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Comments
10

4 December 2018
134.5 mpg. That's good. Or is it a joke test.
P-Man

S4

4 December 2018
Could someone explain that if I was driving around town and used all my battery power for the first 31 miles of my drive, will I actually get 103.5 additional miles on my next gallon of petrol or are the two energies mixed together at different times and under different loads to achieve this? What would the mpg be if I used battery power only around town or is that not an option?

4 December 2018

That's a good one, maybe if the next 103 miles were down hill

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

4 December 2018
S4 wrote:

Could someone explain that if I was driving around town and used all my battery power for the first 31 miles of my drive, will I actually get 103.5 additional miles on my next gallon of petrol or are the two energies mixed together at different times and under different loads to achieve this? What would the mpg be if I used battery power only around town or is that not an option?

You start every day with a full battery, and most people rarely drive more than 50 miles in a day. It's an average number and perfectly feasible. It's not meant to represent one long road trip.

4 December 2018

My new Mitsubishi outlander also supposedly does 31 miles on electric, I'm lucky to get 20 so I get 120 miles out of the next gallon of petrol............Yeh right!

tony

4 December 2018
My 2013 Chevy Volt has better electric range, and the only PHEV that beats it is a Gen 2 Volt.
When will car manufacturers understand that PHEV's need at least 80 miles of pure electric range?
Also, there is no mention of whether the ICE is used to assist with acceleration or only comes on when the battery is depleted. For me, that would be a deal breaker. It needs to be pure electric until the battery is depleted.
The Volt Gen 1/Ampera came out in 2010 and still does this better. New vehicles should be an improvement, not a step back!

4 December 2018

You won't be happy to know production ceases in a few months time then

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

4 December 2018
xxxx wrote:

You won't be happy to know production ceases in a few months time then

My Volt only has 75k miles on it, and I know of at least one that has more than 455k. I intend to drive this thing for a very long time. By then there will hopefully be a sensible PHEV or EV replacement and a better charging infrastructure. I know that this Mercedes ain't it.

As for the question above about fuel economy... Most people rarely drive more than 50 miles in a day, and you start out every morning with a full charge, so that is perfectly realistic as an average figure. You won't get that on a road trip, but between those 2-3 road trips a year there will be many days with minimal or no gasoline/petrol consumed.
I'm at just over 100 mpg for the time I've owned my Volt, but that includes several road trips for work. Lifetime mpg (from previous owners) is 96.

4 December 2018
A powered bootlid? On an E Class saloon? What a bloody waste of time. And more to the point, needless weight and complexity. What sort of imbecilic can't close a boot?

FMS

4 December 2018
eseaton wrote:

A powered bootlid? On an E Class saloon? What a bloody waste of time. And more to the point, needless weight and complexity. What sort of imbecilic can't close a boot?

 

Oh let's see...how about someone with a physical disability?. How does it feel now to have posted with your imbecilic question?.

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