The discovery of Nissan and Subaru’s improper testing last year led to the Japanese government ordering checks, which have now implicated Mazda, Suzuki and Yamaha

Several manufacturers in Japan have been found to have improperly tested cars for emissions and fuel economy in an investigation ordered by the Japanese government after the discovery of Nissan and Subaru's emissions testing impropriety last year. 

Suzuki, Mazda and Yamaha are implicated, although with different levels of severity. 

Mazda released a statement explaining that “Test data containing speed trace errors was found in 72 cases out of 1472 vehicles tested under the JC08 mode.”

The company’s emissions testing system “was not set up to automatically invalidate results when a speed trace error occurred,” it explained, while the level of deviation permitted under the test was at the discretion of each individual inspector. 

As a result, there is no false data in any of Mazda’s test data from either test mode. The company has dealt with the findings by updating its testing system to invalidate test results if a speed trace error is detected, as well as increasing the number of workers checking the data.

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Suzuki UK is awaiting a statement from the company's headquarters in Japan, but Reuters reports that Suzuki admitted to around 6400 cars being improperly inspected, stretching back as far as June 2012. 

“I deeply apologise and will lead efforts to prevent recurrence,” said Suzuki boss Toshihiro Suzuki. No recalls are planned, however, as Suzuki says that no significant problems were found. 

Yamaha is also implicated, but only 2% of inspections on the brand's motorbikes were carried out improperly. 

Autocar is awaiting further comment from Suzuki and Yamaha.

Read more:

Nissan admits misconduct in emissions testing procedure

Yamaha sports car revealed at Tokyo motor show

London and Paris announce real-world emissions testing for cars

New WLTP emissions test: when it's in force and how it could affect your car

Join the debate

Comments
7

9 August 2018

You have to wonder who hasn't massaged their figures...

ex boy scout, engineer and all round geek.....

9 August 2018

it reads more like the factory being in a hurry more than anything else, and the percentages are tiny

9 August 2018

 The japanese are on a roll.

9 August 2018

"Many of the "errors" were simply paperwork issues, and not actual cheats like VW did with diesel emissions. Sometimes the numbers reported were worse than actual. And all of it was related to domestic market requirements only. None of them had any impact on the exported models. "

overblown by the british media.. nothing on level  or scale of what  VW did..

 

 

FMS

9 August 2018
mpls wrote:

"Many of the "errors" were simply paperwork issues, and not actual cheats like VW did with diesel emissions. Sometimes the numbers reported were worse than actual. And all of it was related to domestic market requirements only. None of them had any impact on the exported models. "

overblown by the british media.. nothing on level  or scale of what  VW did..

 

There is simply no link between the two situations, so they must be viewed in isolation. What would your view have been , if there had been no VW "dieselgate"...see my point. If the heads of these companies apologise, even for inadvertant wrongdoing, then we should accept that wrong was done, they will remedy the situation and we all move on...tomorrows metaphoric fish'n'chips wrapping.

 

 

10 August 2018
FMS wrote:

 

There is simply no link between the two situations, so they must be viewed in isolation. What would your view have been , if there had been no VW "dieselgate"...see my point. If the heads of these companies apologise, even for inadvertant wrongdoing, then we should accept that wrong was done, they will remedy the situation and we all move on...tomorrows metaphoric fish'n'chips wrapping.

And also it would appear that the three Japanese companies are not going to spend 6 months lying and staunchly denying it has ever happened, only admitting the truth when threatened with not being permitted to sell their cars in certain markets. A totally different scenario.

 

[/quote]

10 August 2018
FMS wrote:

There is simply no link between the two situations, so they must be viewed in isolation. What would your view have been , if there had been no VW "dieselgate"...see my point. If the heads of these companies apologise, even for inadvertant wrongdoing, then we should accept that wrong was done, they will remedy the situation and we all move on...tomorrows metaphoric fish'n'chips wrapping.

 

 

[/quote]

And also it would appear that the three Japanese companies are not going to spend 6 months lying and staunchly denying it has ever happened, only admitting the truth when threatened with not being permitted to sell their cars in certain markets. A totally different scenario.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week