The Japanese car maker says it has no plans to release an electric-only SUV range
James Attwood, digital editor
9 November 2018

Mitsubishi says its plug-in hybrid technology is essential to meet increasingly tough CO2 emissions regulations - and the next-generation Outlander PHEV will have an electric-only range of around 60 miles.

The Outlander is currently the bestselling plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) in the UK. While increasingly tough CO2 regulations are pushing several car firms towards pure-battery EV technology, Mitsubishi’s strategy boss, Vincent Cobee, says the limitations of full-electric tech mean PHEVs are key to meeting those requirements.

“Battery EVs have a limitation in terms of range at the moment, and in some countries, that might not be the answer,” said Cobee. He added that the firm would add full-electric models to its range, alongside extending its PHEV powertrain to other models.

“The Outlander PHEV currently has an electric-only range of 31 miles, and we’ll extend that with the next-generation model: the aim is 80-100km [50-62 miles], which will be enough for most people to do the bulk of their journeys purely on electric power and live a largely EV lifestyle, but still be able to do longer trips when needed.”

Cobee reiterated that the firm will not develop a bespoke range of EV-specific models in the future, instead offering battery EV, hybrid and PHEV versions of its models. 

He also ruled out a plug-in hybrid version of the current-generation L200 pick-up, which has just been launched, because the technology is not yet cost-effective or beneficial to commercial vehicles – but he said that was likely to change as the technology developed in the coming years.

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Comments
10

9 November 2018

Pity they aren't committed to good style and design.  Until they employ European stylists, their sales will roll along rather than boom.

I say my bit, then go. So although I'm interested in what you may initially say, I don't care what you think about what I've written, so I won't read whatever your reply is.

9 November 2018

And why not? Our Outlander PHEV is a superb general purpose vehicle.

9 November 2018
The improved range sounds great. It is needed now. No idea why they are not thinking of full EV for the outlander. Get 200 mile + real range and that thing would sell like hot cakes.

9 November 2018
Onlineo wrote:

The improved range sounds great. It is needed now. No idea why they are not thinking of full EV for the outlander. Get 200 mile + real range and that thing would sell like hot cakes.

I agree, it needs a long range model now (at least fo the UK) to keep up with tax changes.Problem here is going to be bigger battery = more cost and yet subsidises have been withdrawn. Its going to make already expensive vehicles prohibitively pricey

9 November 2018

The Outlander PHEV has been on the market for about five years and has proven popular but it baffles me why Mitsubishi still haven't put this drivetrain in any other vehicle. They've got the technology and I think a smaller PHEV would be a massive sales success, especially in the current market. They could have beaten their competitors to market but no, having invested what must have been huge sums on a new PHEV drivetrain, they leave it in one vehicle.

10 November 2018

On the same day as this article, news that in the UK people with PHEV often don't even unpack their charging cables, so the car acts as an old fashioned petrol car. This is one reason the government is dropping the tax benefit. Mitsubishi will not be selling any cars in UK in another year or two, all electric is what we need now. Hyundai/Kia will coast past in new car sales, they are cost competitive with the Outlander and much cheaper to run.

Larch Corner is a Passivhaus with solar generation that will run the family EV as well. It's the future, now!

10 November 2018
larch corner eco wrote:

On the same day as this article, news that in the UK people with PHEV often don't even unpack their charging cables, so the car acts as an old fashioned petrol car.

I think we all assumed that in general people rarely plugged them in. But to suggest they are then just an old fashioned petrol car is not really true. When the initial charge runs out they then act as a petrol hybrid, and hybrids are quite a bit more efficient than a straight petrol car. 

10 November 2018
artill wrote:

larch corner eco wrote:

On the same day as this article, news that in the UK people with PHEV often don't even unpack their charging cables, so the car acts as an old fashioned petrol car.

I think we all assumed that in general people rarely plugged them in. But to suggest they are then just an old fashioned petrol car is not really true. When the initial charge runs out they then act as a petrol hybrid, and hybrids are quite a bit more efficient than a straight petrol car. 

That old cheshnut. Fact is it depends on how the employer reimbursed the employee. When we first started allowing them we still used a fuel card. As this did not reimburse the driver any money for their home electricity usage, no one plugged it, why would you subsidise your work?When we switched to fixed per mile (AFR) reimbursement then it soon weeded out those that did want to plug in, they couldn't afford not too! as electric miles are cheaper than petrol miles and you get the same rate for either, you would be a dumb twat not to plug in.

The BBC report did also feature a user who plugged in and did most his journeys on electric and got huge MPG figures.And your right on your second point to, I do high mileage in mine and my lifetime average is 43mpg. If anyone can find me a 200bhp 4.7 metre long autobox 4 wheel drive SUV that does much better in real life (not silly published figures), and then lets see it!

10 November 2018

I'm lucky if I get 20 miles from my 2018 Outlander battery, feel terribly let down after the hype of 33miles.

 

tony

10 November 2018
Glad to see Mitsubishi have some common sense, PHEVs will rule the market in the short-medium term so good for them. Hopefully they offer the drivetrain in other models aswell.

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